16 Ways to Make Your Home More Energy-Efficient

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5. Limit Space Heater Use

Although electric and gas space heaters keep your feet nice and toasty in cooler weather, they aren’t the most efficient way to heat your home. Many space heaters use 1,500 watts of energy to run and are considered to be a costly way to drain your energy bill. Be sure the model of your space heater is energy-efficient; consider layering clothing or investing in blankets instead of cranking up your thermostat.

6. Turn Off Unnecessary Water

According the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the average homeowner can save about $170 a year with small changes to their water usage. Be conscious of running water while brushing your teeth or shaving. Also, bathing typically uses 75 gallons of water compared to a shower that uses about 17.2 gallons on average. You also should avoid running half-loads of laundry in your washer. A full load means more clothes get washed at once, which in turn conserves water (and money).

7. Replace Incandescent Bulbs

In 2014, manufacturers stopped producing 60-watt and 40-watt incandescent lightbulbs (100-watt and 75-watt bulbs were already phased out). But we’re not doomed to live in the dark. Halogen bulbs, compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and light-emitting diode (LED) bulbs offer longer lasting light and are more energy-efficient than your old incandescent bulbs. Since the average home uses 40 bulbs, switching over to greener bulbs is a great way to save on your electrical bill.

8. Unplug Unused Chargers

Cell phone and battery chargers that are plugged in but not in use are often referred to as energy vampires. According to Energy.gov, the average charger consumes 0.26 watts of energy when not in use and 2.24 watts when connected to your phone. Alone, one charger won’t make much impact, but collectively energy vampires can be responsible for 10% of your energy bill. So, unplug your chargers when not in use.

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